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HANDBOOK

NYHL Handbook

 

  
NYHL Introduction & House League Sections

 

1. INTRODUCTION

The NYHL is a nonprofit, all-volunteer organization which has existed in Nashville since 1965. The NYHL encourages, develops, advances and administers amateur youth hockey in Nashville and its surrounding communities. The NYHL strives to afford people the privilege of participating in youth hockey and related activities in an environment which allows players to learn the fundamental skills of hockey and experience the fun of playing the game without placing undue emphasis on "winning." By so doing, it is the NYHL's intention to promote the development of character, integrity, good sportsmanship and an appreciation for teamwork and its importance.

2. THE GOVERNING BODY

The NYHL is a nonprofit, tax exempt corporation organized under the laws of the State of Tennessee. The NYHL adheres to the Official Playing Rules published by USA Hockey, Inc., and generally follows the guidelines and policies of USA Hockey, Inc., except as otherwise set forth herein, or as established by the NYHL Board of Directors. The NYHL is currently affiliated with USA Hockey, Inc., through the Southern Amateur Hockey Association and also with the Southern Youth Travel Hockey League.

The activities of the NYHL are managed by a Board of Directors who are elected according to the bylaws by Board members at one of the Board meetings held during the spring. The fiscal year for the NYHL commences May 1 and ends April 30.

The Board of Directors generally meets at least once each month. A majority of Directors serves as a quorum and is required for all official Board actions except as otherwise designated. Board meetings are closed to the public and visitors. However, upon request, the President of the NYHL may allow visitors to attend Board meetings and address the Board on certain issues.

Officers of the Board consist of a President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer. Other members of the Board are appointed to various positions as determined according to the bylaws and the needs of the organization.

Special committees are formed as necessary to work on special projects or to oversee certain activities. Committee members need not be on the Board of Directors, although all committees have at least one member who is a Board member. All Board members and officers of the NYHL are volunteers. They receive no compensation or remuneration for their work on behalf of the League.

3. GENERAL PROGRAM STRUCTURE AND PLAYER CLASSIFICATIONS

A. General Program Structure

The NYHL program structure is generally consistent with that recommended by USA Hockey. These categories include:

1) Initiation - This program is designed to meet the need of the beginning player learning to skate, and basic hockey skills are taught equally in a noncompetitive environment. Fun, physical development and sociable environment are stressed.

2) Recreational - The backbone of youth hockey is recreational hockey. This program encourages internal or House League play. This program is designed to provide opportunities to play for enjoyment, fitness, relaxation and fellowship. Skill development and team concepts are emphasized, rather than winning.

3) Competitive - Coaches teach higher level skill development for players within the NYHL who have the desire and ability for a competitive hockey experience. The NYHL Travel League is in this category. Balance between winning and sportsmanship is stressed. The amount of traveling for competition should be reasonable. Team objectives can include local, league, district, regional and national championships.

B. Player Classifications

Most current NYHL Travel, House, House League All-Star, and Select programs are divided into multiple player classifications. These hockey player classifications are also commonly referred to as Divisions. The classification of a player is determined by his/her age attained after January 1st of the upcoming fall playing season.

The classifications are:

MIDGET 18U - 18 years old or younger.

MIDGET 16U - 16 years old or younger.

BANTAM - 14 years old or younger.

PEEWEE - 12 years old or younger.

SQUIRT - 10 years old or younger.

MITE- 8 years old or younger.

TERMITE -  7 years old or younger.

From time to time the classification of Termites might be eliminated and these players may be registered as Mites.

C. House League And Travel League

The regular NYHL season extends from mid September to early March. During this time the NYHL conducts a House League program and a Travel League program. The House League program provides recreational players with the opportunity to learn and develop the fundamental skills of hockey. It strives to provide equal playing time for all House League players in accordance with playing rules established by the NYHL.

The NYHL Travel League program provides players with the opportunity to learn, develop and master the fundamental skills of hockey in a more competitive environment than afforded within the House League, including exposure to national and international competition.

D. Learn-To-Skate And Skills Sessions

In addition to the House League and Travel League programs, the NYHL sponsors, or co-sponsors with the Metro Department of Parks and Recreation ("Metro"), Learn-to-Skate programs for beginning skaters. The sessions are intended to teach players the skill which is most essential to the game of ice hockey - ice skating.

After players learn to skate, there are hockey skills sessions available which are conducted by NYHL coaches, Director of Hockey or other volunteers. These skills sessions are usually offered in the spring after the NYHL regular season ends, during the summer and in the fall before the regular season begins. The skills taught include ice skating, puck handling, passing, shooting and other hockey skills.

E. Non-affiliated Summer Camps

During the summer months youngsters can attend one or more hockey camps that are held at the Centennial Sportsplex and are conducted by professional players and coaches from across the United States and Canada. Usually these camps last one or two weeks and are organized so that players participate at their proper skill level (beginner, intermediate, advanced, etc.). These camps are not affiliated with the NYHL, but are held at the Centennial Sportsplex where many NYHL House and Travel players participate to develop and improve their hockey skills.


THE HOUSE LEAGUE

The goal of the NYHL House League is to provide an opportunity for individual and team skill development, and an equal opportunity for each player to enjoy ice hockey for fun and exercise. The House League program includes Initiation and Recreational levels of play, as defined by USA Hockey.

All players will be assigned to a team after the House League evaluation. Depending upon the number of registered players, House teams will average 13 to 15 players and one goalie. The House League will practice and play games at the Nashville Centennial Sportsplex and other possible venues.

A. House League Structure

The House League program structure will generally adhere to the program structure and player classifications as set forth by USA Hockey, However, in the House League the NYHL currently consists of six "divisions" rather than five as defined by USA Hockey. Players are enrolled in a division based on their age attained at midnight, January 1st, of the current playing season. The current divisions are:

BANTAM- 14 years old or younger. (Checking and slapshots allowed)

PEE WEE - 12 years old or younger. (No checking in games but slapshots allowed)

SQUIRT 10 years old or younger. (No checking nor slapshots)

MITE - 8 years old or younger. (No checking nor slapshots)

TERMITE - 7 years old or younger. (No checking nor slapshots)

The NYHL reserves the right to establish, or eliminate, different playing divisions and different age criteria for playing in any division in its House League if its Board of Directors determines this to be necessary. House League player rosters may be changed and players transferred from one team to another at any time before or during a season to ensure fair play and competitiveness and to ensure that the purposes of the NYHL are being met. This may include allowing players upon request, or requiring players under certain circumstances, to play up in older age divisions when the Board of Directors determines they are capable of doing so.

B. Player Evaluations

Before the start of the season, the House League will evaluate all players to determine their skill level. The evaluations will be coordinated by the Director of Hockey and the House League Coordinator to be conducted based upon the evaluation plan as approved by the Board.

The results of this evaluation will be used by the coaches to conduct a draft, making reasonable attempts to assemble evenly matched teams. Players will be evaluated within their division based on the following skills:

·         Skating

·         Shooting

·         Passing and receiving

·         Puck handling

·         Goal tending

C. House League Draft

Immediately following the House League evaluations for each division, the coaches in that division will conduct a draft under the guidance of the Division Coordinator or his designee. Coaches will use the player's evaluation scores to rank them among their peers within the division. The coaches will also try to take into account player size and experience when drafting. The coaches will then place the players on teams.

All reasonable attempts will be made to conduct the draft fairly and equitably, to draft teams that will be evenly matched, and to draft so as not to create any team or teams that have an unfair competitive advantage or disadvantage. Attempts will be made to place members of the same family, who are playing or coaching within the same division, on the same team in order to ease the travel burden on families. However, because of the many variables involved in providing team balance and equality, it may not be possible to accommodate all requests for players to be on the same team for carpool purposes or for other reasons.

D. House League Playing Rules

The House League generally follows the official playing rules published by USA Hockey. There are exceptions, however, to some of these rules in order to allow the

House League to function as intended. For example, the penalty times imposed with the House League may vary from those published by USA Hockey. Limitations on the number of goals scored by an individual player may also be imposed by the NYHL where none are imposed by USA Hockey. The length of time which players are on the ice ("shift time") is limited in the NYHL House League whereas USA Hockey has no such limitations. These rules may change or vary from season to season.

Some of the rules and policies which are unique to the NYHL House League include, but are not limited to, the following:

 1. MATCHING SKILL LEVELS - Whenever possible players should be matched against players of comparable ability and all players should receive an equal amount of playing time in each game.

2. PENALTY TIME - Some penalty times in the House League vary from those provided for by USA Hockey. Please see below:

 

NYHL House League Penalty Times (in minutes)
 

                    Mite   Squirt    PeeWee  Bantam 

Minor             1.5        1.5    2.0          2.0        

Double Minor  3.0        3.0   4.0          4.0        

Major             5.0        5.0    5.0          5.0        

Misconduct                      10 MINUTE FOR ALL AGES

3. THREE (3) GOAL LIMIT - There is currently a three (3) goal limit per player in all House League games. This rule provides as follows:

There is a three (3) goal limit per player in ALL HOUSE LEAGUE GAMES IN ALL DIVISIONS BELOW BANTAM.

After an individual player has scored three (3) goals in one game, any further goals scored by that player SHALL BE DISALLOWED and will NOT be counted on the scoreboard or recorded on the official scoresheet.

After a player who has already scored three (3) goals, scores additional goals, the referee SHALL DISALLOW ALL additional goals and shall recommence play with a face-off at center ice.

4) "PLAY-UP" RULES - Generally all players in the NYHL shall be required to play or participate on teams within the division required by their age as of January 1 for the season in question. There are exceptions to this rule in the House League which include, but may not be limited to, the following: : 

a) A player may be required to "play up" in a higher age division temporarily or permanently under certain circumstances, including when such action is needed to insure competitiveness in one of more playing divisions, or where there is a shortage of key players (e.g. goalies) or due to a shortage of players generally (e.g. only eight players register for a team), or a shortage of talented players within a particular division. For these, and other reasons deemed necessary, the Board of Directors may require that players "play up" in higher age divisions. Players and/or parents who refuse to "play up " when required to do so may forfeit their eligibility to participate in NYHL activities and may receive a refund of the unused portion of their registration fee for that season.

b) A player may be permitted to "play up" in a higher age division on a permanent basis under the following conditions: the parent(s)/guardian(s) of the player gives their written permission to the Board ofDirectors for their child to "play up" and the Board approves their request. c) A player may be permitted to "play up" in a higher age division on a temporary basis under the following conditions:

1) When the player's parent(s)/guardian(s) give their written permission to the Board of Directors for their child to "play up ", AND,

2) When the coaches of the lower division team and the higher division team give their permission for the child to "play up"; OR,

3) When the parent (s)/guardian(s) of the player give their written permission to the Board of Directors for their child to "play up" and the Board of Directors grants permission for the player to "play up."

 

In regard to when players may "play up," the following principles will be adhered to by all players, parents, coaches and Board members involved in these decisions:

 a) The safety of all players is always a primary consideration of the NYHL and its coaches. No player will be allowed to "play up" when it would be unsafe to do so.

b) The NYHL seeks to promote competitive teams in all divisions within the House and Travel Leagues. Promotion of competitive teams does not mean that "winning" is the NYHL's primary objective. Players will not be allowed to "play up" solely to allow higher division teams to win more games. Likewise, players will not be prevented from "playing up" solely to maintain a winning advantage for the lower division team to which a player would normally belong. Players who are "playing up" should not be allowed to dislodge or bump off of team rosters those players who are already properly on such rosters by virtue of their age. The interests of the NYHL as a whole shall be considered paramount to the interests of individual players, parents or coaches. Circumstances which are not expressly mentioned in this rule shall be governed by the decisions of the Board of Directors.

5) "PLAYING-DOWN" - No NYHL player will be allowed to play down in a lower age division than that which is required by his age attained as of January 1st prior to the season in question. Circumstances which are not expressly mentioned in this rule shall be governed by the decisions of the Board of Directors.

6) THREE (3) GAME RULE - No NYHL player shall be allowed to play more than three (3) games in any day under any circumstances.

The above-listed rules are not intended to be all inclusive. Rules may be added, dropped or modified at any time. Parents and players should remember that the NYHL House League is intended to promote and encourage kids to have fun learning to play the great game of hockey. It is not intended to promote or overemphasize individual accomplishments (e.g. scoring lots of goals) or "winning." The NYHL Board of Directors will change its By-Laws, Rules and Regulations as deemed necessary from time to time in order to insure that its purpose and objectives are being met.

F. The Cost of House League Play 

Each season the NYHL Board of Directors establishes registration fees for the House and Travel Leagues. These fees are based upon the cost of ice which the League must purchase from the Metropolitan Government of Nashville. The fees charged to House League players are usually one-half those charged to Travel League players, or less.

In addition to registration fees, players who need to rent equipment may do so from the NYHL for a rental fee. (Further details about equipment rental are provided elsewhere in this handbook.)

 

 

 

 

 

            

The Travel League Section

 

The goal of the NYHL Travel League is to provide the opportunity for individual and team skill development in competition with other youth hockey programs principally in the Southeast, but also in other parts of the United States. NYHL's Travel teams currently play their regular season in the Southern Youth Travel Hockey League, which currently consists of Atlanta, Birmingham, Huntsville, Memphis, Nashville, Knoxville and other Southern Amateur Hockey Association programs. The Travel League program includes Competitive and Select levels of play, as defined by USA Hockey.

All registered and paid-up players are eligible to participate in the Travel League evaluation. Travel teams usually average 15 to 17 skaters and one or two goalies. The Travel teams usually practice once or twice a week and play three or four games during a weekend.

Out-of-town trips generally require one to two nights in a hotel, as games usually start early both Saturday and Sunday. Each player must be accompanied by an adult on out-of-town trips and in each hotel room. Each player and family must provide their own transportation and are responsible for the costs of travel, room and board. 

A. The Number of Travel Games

The exact number of games played by each team will vary from team to team. Usually the younger players (Squirts) play fewer games than the older players. Typically the Squirt Travel team may play approximately 35-45 games per season. The older players may play between 35-60 games per season. All teams will usually play against Southern Youth Hockey League members. In addition, individual teams may arrange a reasonable number of other games or enter a reasonable number of tournaments outside of the Southern Youth Hockey League. Approximately one-half of all games are played at home in Nashville and one-half are played "on the road" in other cities.

 

 

B. Costs Associated With Travel Hockey

Registration fees for Travel hockey may vary from year to year, but usually they are at least twice as much as House League fees. These higher fees are charged to pay for the increased ice time that Travel players receive. In addition to these registration fees, Travel team players and families will incur the normal costs associated with traveling to other cities to play games on Saturdays and Sundays. These costs include gasoline, meals, hotel rooms and other miscellaneous expenses. There are also additional fees for participating in tournaments in other cities.

In an effort to keep costs at a minimum, the NYHL tries to arrange for group discount rates at motels and many parents reduce expenses by traveling together, sharing motel rooms where feasible, etc.

C. Playing Time And Travel League Philosophy

The NYHL Travel Team League is not conducted like the House League. In the House League each player is assured of playing a certain number of shifts and a certain amount of time during each game. In the House League the primary emphasis is placed on player participation and development of skills, not upon winning games. In the House League every effort is made to insure that all players are treated alike whether they are experienced, skilled players or just beginners.

The emphasis with our older Travel teams (Squirts through Midgets) is somewhat different. These NYHL Travel teams attempt to win every game they play. Travel team coaches will try to accomplish this by putting their best players on the ice as much as possible. In some close, hard-fought games this could mean that less skilled players, or developmental players, could receive little or no playing time at all. The decision as to when players should be inserted (if at all) and how much time they should play is a decision made by the coach. NYHL coaches are aware of the need to give all players "game experience" if they are going to develop and improve their skills. However, coaches are not expected to play every player in every game if the outcome of the game

All NYHL Travel teams usually travel to the annual Southeastern Regional Silversticks Tournament in Huntsville, or Atlanta. Post-season tournaments include District Championships for Pee Wee, Bantam, and Midget teams if they qualify. Many additional tournament opportunities are considered separately by each of the five (5) Travel teams. Teams will often play in St. Louis, Missouri; Louisville, Kentucky; and Columbus, Evansville, and Indianapolis, Indiana, in addition to all Southern Youth Hockey League member cities.

D. Travel League Structure

The Travel League structure generally adheres to the structure and player classifications as set forth by USA Hockey. The Travel program will be divided into five "divisions," with one Travel team per division. Players will be enrolled in a division based on their age at midnight, January 1, of the prior playing season. The divisions are:

MIDGET 18U – 18 years old or younger.

MIDGET 16U – 16 years old or younger

BANTAM - 14 years old or younger.

PEE WEE - 12 years old or younger.

SQUIRT -10 years old or younger.

MITE – 8 years or younger

Players in the NYHL Travel League program participate at the Competitive level of play, as defined by USA Hockey. Travel players may also have an opportunity to attend USA Hockey Select Camps.

1) COMPETITIVE - As defined by USA Hockey, "well-qualified coaches
teach higher level skill development for players who have the desire and
ability for a competitive experience. A balance of winning and
sportsmanship is stressed. Efforts are made to keep the amount of travel
for competition reasonable. Team objectives can include local, league,
state and national championships." The NYHL Travel League competes
at this level. As a Competitive level team, Travel outings will focus more
on winning (except at the Mite level) than in regular House League
Recreational play. Players on NYHL Travel teams will attempt to
compete at the highest level and win every game and tournament they
compete in. This does not mean that Travel teams will attempt to win at
all costs, but it should be understood that Competitive level teams are
philosophically different than Recreational teams in the House League.

2) SELECT- As defined by USA Hockey, Select is "A high-level-national program which draws from the very best players in programs across the country, then prepares them to play for the United States in international competitions."

E. Travel League Evaluations

Tryouts for travel teams are held at the beginning of each season, usually in September or earlier, if possible. Tryout sessions will be used by team coaches to evaluate the skills (skating, passing, receiving, puck handling, shooting, goal tending) of each player. Those players who are judged to have the best skills will be selected by the Evaluation Committee to play on the team. In addition, coaches may, in their discretion, choose some players with less skill or experience who show good potential for development. Whether any such "developmental players" will be selected on the team depends upon many factors and will vary from team to team. If a coach designates a player as a "developing player" and selects him to be on the team, the player and his parents will be advised of this decision and its ramifications is uncertain. On the other hand, coaches are encouraged and expected to insert as many players as possible when the outcome of a game is reasonably certain. It is the goal of the NYHL to insure that over the course of a season all Travel players receive approximately the same amount of ice time.

The Squirt Travel team is not handled exactly like the older Travel teams. Because of the young age of Squirt players and their relative inexperience, more emphasis is placed on skill development and learning hockey fundamentals, than on winning games. Greater effort will be made at the Squirt level to achieve equal playing time for all players in each game and to make participation and development the team's primary goal rather than a winning record.

 

 

F. "Play-Up" Rules

Generally all players in the NYHL shall be required to play or participate on teams within the division required by their age attained during the season in question. There are exceptions to this rule in the Travel League which include, but may not be limited to, the following:

1) A player may be required to "play up" in a higher age division
temporarily or permanently under certain circumstances, including when
such action is needed to insure competitiveness in one or more playing
divisions, or where there is a shortage of key players (e.g. goalies) or due
to a shortage of players generally (e.g. only eight players register for a
team), or a shortage of talented players within a particular division. For
these, and other reasons deemed necessary, the Board of Directors may
require that players "play up" in higher age divisions. Players and/or
parents who refuse to "play up" when required to do so may forfeit their
eligibility to participate in NYHL activities and may receive a refund of
the unused portion of their registration fee for that season.

2) A player may be permitted to "play up" in a higher age division on a permanent basis under the following conditions: the parent(s)/guardian(s) of the player must give their written permission to the Board of Directors for their child to "play up" and the Board must approve their request

3) A player may be permitted to "play up" in a higher age division on a temporary basis under the following conditions:

a) When the player's parent(s)/guardian(s) give their written permission to the Board of Directors for their child to "play up", AND,

b) When the coaches of the lower division team and the higher division team give their permission for the child to "play up "; OR,

c) When the parent(s)/guardian(s) of the player give their written permission to the Board of Directors for their child to "play up" and the Board of Directors grants permission for the player to "play up."

In regard to when players may "play up," the following principles will be adhered to by all players, parents, coaches and Board members involved in these decisions:

1) The safety of all players is always a primary consideration of the NYHL and its coaches. No player will be allowed to "play up " when it would be unsafe to do so.

2) The NYHL seeks to promote competitive teams in all divisions within the House and Travel Leagues. Promotion of competitive teams does not mean that "winning" is the NYHL's primary objective. Players will not be allowed to "play up" solely to allow higher division teams to win more games. Likewise, players will not be prevented from "playing up" solely to maintain a winning advantage for the lower division team to which a player would normally belong. Players who are "playing up" should not be allowed to dislodge or bump off of team rosters those players who are already properly on such rosters by virtue of their age. The interests of the NYHL as a whole shall be considered paramount to the interests of individual players, parents or coaches. Circumstances which are not expressly mentioned in this rule shall be governed by the decisions of the Board of Directors.

G. "Playing Down"

No NYHL player will be allowed to play down in a lower age division than that which is required by his age attained during the season in question.

H. Limitations On Games Played

No NYHL player shall be allowed to play more than three (3) games in any day under
any circumstances. '

I. Benefits Of Travel Hockey

Participation in the NYHL Travel Team League has much to offer any child. Travel team hockey is highly competitive, challenging and fun. It provides a sense of accomplishment to every player who makes the team whether the player is highly skilled or one who is just developing. Travel players spend much time practicing and playing games and learning the meaning of teamwork. They feel the sense of accomplishment that comes with making a Travel Team which represents their city and League when they travel and play in other cities. The travel aspect of their play lends somewhat greater importance to their games and enhances their achievements when they occur "on the road." In short, Travel team play has a positive impact on the confidence, self-image and development of most youngsters who participate in the program. It also goes without saying that all Travel team players benefit from playing against the best players from other cities and from having available a substantial amount of ice time to improve their skills.

 

 

    

 

 

 

PLAYER’S RESPONSIBILITIES

The NYHL wants all youngsters who participate in the NYHL ice hockey program to have fun, develop their skills, and get along with their teammates. As with most activities, the benefit the player will get from the sport is directly related to the amount of effort they put into it. The player’s responsibilities listed here will help players know what is expected of them and what they can do to get the most out of their ice hockey experience.

All players will be assigned to a team with at least one head coach and one assistant coach. Players are responsible to the coaches and to the team. Players should show appropriate respect to their coaches, to all other coaches and NYHL officials, to their teammates and to other players.

All players are required to follow NYHL and USA Hockey playing rules and the NYHL Player’s Code of Conduct.

While it is fun to play hockey and win, players should understand that winning is not the most important thing in youth hockey. It is more important for players to improve their skills, learn about teamwork, loyalty and discipline, and to have fun, whether they win or not!

A. USA Hockey Core Values

To help understand what the players' responsibilities are, it might be helpful to consider the USA Hockey Core Values which are set forth below:

SPORTSMANSHIP - Foremost of all values is to learn a sense of fair play. Become humble in victory, gracious in defeat We will foster friendships with teammates and opponents alike.

RESPECT FOR THE INDIVIDUAL - Treat all others as you expect to be treated.

INTEGRITY- We seek to foster honesty and fair play beyond mere strict interpretation of the rules and regulations of the game.

PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE AT THE INDIVIDUAL, TEAM AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEVELS - Each member of the organization, whether player, volunteer or staff, should seek to perform each aspect of the game to the highest level of his or her ability.

ENJOYMENT - It is important for the hockey experience to be fun, satisfying and rewarding for the participant.

LOYALTY - We aspire to teach loyalty to the ideals and to the fellow members of the sport of hockey.

TEAMWORK - We value the strength of learning to work together. The use of teamwork is reinforced and rewarded by success in the hockey experience.

B. Basic Player's Responsibilities

·         All players should be supportive of their coaches and teammates. All comments should be supportive, positive, constructive and enthusiastic.

·         Players should give their best efforts during games and practices.

·         Players are expected to be at all games and practices. They should arrive well ahead of time so that they can get dressed and ready to participate in team activity as decided by the coach. If a player will be late or miss a game or practice, it is that player's responsibility to inform the coach ahead of time.

·         At times the coaches will inform the players of upcoming activities and ? scheduled events, or changes to the schedule. Sometimes the coaches will give v players paperwork or other information that needs to be given to their parents. Players are responsible for passing this information to their parents.

·         Players are responsible for their own equipment. They should make sure they have at their required equipment present and in good condition for every game and practice. Required equipment is listed below:

HECC-approved helmet with face mask that provides full facial protection, and any chin protection that accompanies the face mask.

Internal mouthpiece

Neck guard

Shoulder pads

Elbow pads

Shin pads

Gloves

Padded hockey pants or hip pads

Skates

Stick

Supporter and cup

Jersey and socks

·         Players should see to it that their equipment is properly cared for after use. This includes drying and washing equipment and/or making sure it is in good condition. (If equipment is damaged or in questionable condition, this should be reported to parents or coaches.) Players should make sure that they have sufficient amounts of tape and other items required for their equipment.

·         It is important that hockey players keep in shape. This includes following a proper diet, especially before games and practices. Players should exercise and stretch to keep physically fit between games and practices. For maximum benefit and improvement, players should also ice skate for recreation, such as at public sessions, skill sessions and other instructional programs.

·         All concerns, problems and questions should be directed to one of the coaches at the proper place and time. Problems should also be discussed with parents who, in turn, can discuss them with the coaches at the appropriate place and time.

·         When traveling for competition, players must behave properly. Players must keep in mind that they are representatives of Nashville and the NYHL and act accordingly,* All players must read and comply with the Players' Code of Conduct. Players should also read and follow this Handbook of Rules, Policies and Guidelines.

·         Learn the rules and play by them. Always be a good sport.

·         Respect your coach, your teammates, your parents, opponents and officials.

·         Never argue with an official's decision.

C. Players' Communications With Officials

One common misconception is that the captain of the team is the only player who is entitled to talk to an official during a game. Although USA Hockey playing rules clearly outline the proper procedure for a captain to approach an official, there may be times when a non-captain can communicate a concern or ask a question of the official. In these instances it is important for the captain or player to remain calm and refrain from using abusive or threatening language. The concern or question should be related to a rule interpretation and not to the official's judgment Be specific and respect the official's response, whether you agree or not. A well-timed and phrased question will keep the officials on their toes and will help establish a mutual respect.

Many officials will speak up or verbalize during play in an effort to keep play moving or diffuse a potentially volatile situation. When this occurs, please keep in mind that the official is communicating for your benefit and is not keen on having to repeat the warning. This procedure is often used in situations where the puck is stalled along the boards and the players are making very little effort to keep the puck in play. Your cooperation when the official says "move the puck" will help avoid an unnecessary stoppage of play, minimize the potential for injury and decrease your odds of having a penalty assessed for delay of game. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

Parent Responsibilities and Spectator Reminders

 

PARENT'S RESPONSIBILITIES

The sport of youth hockey is greatly enhanced by the support, cooperation and assistance given by parents. The most important part of a parent's support is the encouragement they give to their child, the player. Parents can help their child and everyone involved in youth hockey by showing an interest in the sport and the team. Parents are encouraged to support team functions and are invited to volunteer to help the NYHL in any way they can. Without the involvement of parents who volunteer to help the NYHL, there would be no youth hockey program in Nashville.

Parents provide an example for players to follow. They should serve as role models to the players by the manner in which they enjoy the game and by the support they give coaches and the NYHL program. Any concerns or opinions that parents wish to express to coaches or officials should be communicated in a mature and appropriate way at the proper place and time.

Parents and coaches should try to develop relationships that will provide an enjoyable experience for everyone involved. Parents and coaches should develop a working relationship that will help the player achieve his or her maximum benefit from playing ice hockey.

Remember, parents, your child is playing hockey. Help your child play the game for him or herself, to achieve their own goals. It is important that too heavy a burden not be placed on your child to win games. A recent survey revealed that 72% of children would rather play for a losing team that ride the bench for a winning team. Players gain the most by learning about themselves and about sportsmanship while they are enjoying the exciting sport of ice hockey.

A. Philosophy For Parents

The NYHL does not presume to tell parents how they must rear their children. However, the NYHL does feel that there are some concepts about youth sports that all parents should try to keep in mind as they watch their children win, lose, succeed and fail in youth sports, including youth hockey.

1) Do not impose your ambitions on your child. Remember that hockey is your child's activity. Improvement and progress occur at different rates for each individual Don't judge your child's progress based on the performance of other athletes, and don't push them based on what you think they should be doing.

2) Be supportive no matter what. There is only one question to ask your child — "Did you have fun?" If games and practices are not fun, your child should not be forced to participate.

3) Don't undermine your child's coach. Do you undermine your child's coach by trying to coach your child on the side. Your job is to support and love your child no matter what, and the coach is responsible for the technical part of the job.

4) Try to say only positive things at a hockey same. If you are going to show up at a hockey game, you should cheer and applaud, but never criticize your child, other children, the coaches or officials. Always strive to set a good example for your child.

5) Try to acknowledge your child's fears. A first hockey game (or every  hockey game) can be a stressful situation. It is totally appropriate for your child to be anxious. Don't yell or belittle, just assure your child to do the very best they can do. You should expect no more.

6) Try not to criticize the officials. If you do not have the time or the desire to volunteer as an official, please don't criticize those who are doing the best they can.

7) Respect your child's coach. The bond between coach and player is a special one and one that contributes to your child's success as well as fun. Do not criticize the coach in the presence of your child. It will likely confuse your child and detract from the experience he or she is having. Speak to the coach at the appropriate time and place.

8) Give your child goals besides winning. Giving an honest effort, regardless of the outcome, is much more important than winning. An Olympic swimmer once said, "My goal was to set a world record. Well, I did that but someone did it too, just a little faster than I did. I achieved my goal and I lost. That does not make me a failure. In fact, I am very proud of that race."

9) Always place your child first above everything. Ask yourself this question — Are your child's goals more important to you than they are to your child? Remember that the focus of youth sports should be fun. Children are constantly changing and their goals, interests and participation in activities will change as well. Parents should remain flexible, patient and always supportive while their children strive to find their niche in life.

10) Have realistic expectations for your child. There are more than 500,000 players registered with USA Hockey. The odds of your child becoming a star in the NHL are daunting. Counting the number of Canadian, Russian, and European players playing in the NHL, your child's chances of making it to that level are very small Remember that hockey is much more than just the NHL. Ask your coach why he coaches. Chances are he was not an NHL player but still got enough out of hockey that he wants to pass that love for the sport on to others. Hockey teaches self-discipline and sportsmanship. It builds self-esteem and fitness. It provides lifelong friendships and much more. Hockey builds good people and you should be happy that your child wants to participate.

 

B. Basic Parents' Responsibilities

·         All parents should be supportive of their player, their teammates, coaches and other parents. Comments should be supportive, positive and constructive.

·         Parents, together with the coaches and players, share the responsibility for player safety. Parents should make sure that players are aware of basic on-ice safety, as outlined in this handbook.

·         All parents and players must obey the NYHL rules, policies, guidelines and codes of conduct. Parents and players should also read and follow this Handbook of Rules, Policies and Guidelines.

REMEMBER: Participating in NYHL activities is a privilege, not a right. Players and parents are required to follow the rules, policies and guidelines of this association.

·         Parents should help players be responsible for their own equipment. They should make sure they have all their required equipment present and in good condition for every game and practice. Required equipment is listed elsewhere in this Handbook.

·         Parents and players should see to it that their equipment is properly cared for after use, including drying and washing of equipment, and making sure it is in good condition. (If equipment is damaged or in questionable condition, this should be brought to the coaches' attention.) Make sure that players have sufficient amounts of tape and other items required for their equipment.

·         Parents should ensure that players attend all games and practices and arrive in plenty of time so that they can get dressed and participate in team activity as decided by the coach. If a player will be late or miss a game or practice, it is that player's responsibility to inform the coach sufficiently ahead of time. Parents should make sure that the player carries out this task.

·         Parents should remember that at times the coaches will inform the players of upcoming activities and scheduled events, or changes to the schedule. Sometimes the coaches will give players paperwork or other information that needs to be given to their parents. Players are responsible for passing this information to their parents, so parents might want to ask players after practices or games if there is any information for them.

·         Parents should be instrumental in helping their hockey player keep in shape. This includes following a proper diet, especially before games and practices. Players should exercise and stretch to keep physically fit between games and practices. For maximum benefit and improvement, players should also ice skate for recreation, such as at public sessions, skill sessions and other instructional programs.

REMINDERS FOR SPECTATORS AT NYHL EVENTS

The NYHL wants everyone who participates in or observes ice hockey practices, games and other programs to enjoy themselves. The following reminders might help everyone in the stands and on the ice to have a good time:

A) Remember that children play organized sports for their own fun. They are not there to entertain you, and they are not miniature pro athletes.

B) Be on your best behavior. Don't use profane or abusive language or harass players, coaches, officials or other spectators. -

C)  Applaud good plays by your own team and the visiting team.

D) Show respect for your team's opponents. Without them, there would be no games.

E) Never ridicule or scold a child for making a mistake during a game.

F) Respect the official’s decisions.

G) Encourage players always to play according to the rules.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

Coaches Section

 

 NYHL COACHES

The NYHL recruits and develops volunteer coaches whose role is to help players get the most out of their participation in ice hockey and to set a positive role model and example for the players. Coaches are encouraged to participate in training programs designed for coaches, including the required Coaching Education Program clinics offered by USA Hockey.

Each team will normally be assigned a head coach and at least one assistant coach. While each coach may share equally in the duties required to run the team, the final responsibility for the team belongs to the head coach. Coaches are to ensure that all NYHL and USA Hockey standards are adhered to by themselves and their players.

Coaches should develop relationships with players so that they can teach, lead, protect and care for them. Coaches must also develop relationships with parents in order to provide a fruitful and enjoyable experience for everyone involved. Coaches and parents should develop a working relationship that will help the player achieve his or her maximum benefit from playing ice hockey.

The on-ice conduct of hockey teams is frequently a reflection of the coach's attitude toward the game. Excessively penalized play, unnecessary roughness, verbal abuse of officials and opponents and toleration of profanity will be considered a product of the coach's approach to the game. Coaches will share responsibility with the parents and players for players' actions during games and practices and while in any ice facility. Travel coaches also share responsibility with parents and players for the conduct of their players when they travel for NYHL competition.

Coaches should try to be good communicators. The coach must make sure that all players and parents are aware of the practice/game schedule. The coach should be able to clearly communicate practice and game objectives to players and parents. Coaches should listen to concerns expressed by players and parents in order to maximize the hockey experience for all involved whenever possible.

A. NYHL Coaching Philosophy

Although all NYHL coaches are volunteers who are not compensated for their time and effort, they are nevertheless expected to remember that they are entrusted with the minds and hearts of children who want to learn to play hockey and have fun. They are coaching for the players, the kids, and not for themselves or for the parents or spectators. With this in mind the NYHL encourages its coaches to adhere to the following NYHL Coaching Philosophy:

1) Coaches should be reasonable in their demands on young players' time, energy and enthusiasm and remember that they have other interests.

2) Coaches should teach players that rules of the game are mutual agreements which no one should deliberately evade or break.

3) Coaches should group players according to age, height, skill and physical maturity whenever possible.

4) Coaches should avoid over-playing the experienced or exceptionally, talented players. The "just-average" players need and deserve equal time and attention.

5) Coaches should remember that children play for fun and enjoyment and that winning is only part of it. Coaches should not ridicule or verbally abuse children for making mistakes or losing a competition.

6) Coaches should insure that equipment and facilities meet safety standards and are appropriate for the age and ability of the players.

7) Coaches should schedule the length of practices and competitions, taking into consideration the maturity level of the children involved.

8) Coaches should develop team respect for the ability of opponents, as well as for the judgment of officials and opposing coaches.

9) Coaches should remember that children need a coach they can respect. They should be generous with praise when it is deserved and set a good example.

10) Coaches should make a personal commitment to keep themselves informed on sound coaching principles and the principles of growth and development of children.

B. Basic Coaching Responsibilities

1) Coaches should be present before, during and after games and practices in order to coach their players. A coach should always be present on the ice when players are on the ice for practice, and on the bench when players are on the ice for a game. Dressing rooms should be supervised by team coaches while in use before and after games and practices. If a coach cannot be present, he should try to arrange for a suitable adult replacement.

2) Coaches should see to it that no one is on the bench unless they are players or coaches on the teams that are currently playing or practicing or are authorized to keep score or serve as timekeeper.

3) Coaches are responsible for providing the game scoresheets. This responsibility may be delegated to a team manager. Coach/managers should see that:

a) the scoresheet is properly filled out with the team name, division, date and players' names and numbers;

b) at the end of the game, the scoresheet must be signed by the referees and scorekeeper;

c) copies of game scoresheets should be distributed to the visiting coach and to the appropriate League official

4) Each coach, home and away, should attempt to provide one volunteer adult to serve as either scorekeeper or timekeeper during games and one volunteer adult to supervise his team's penalty box.

5) It is the coach's responsibility to be prepared with game or practice plans before his team goes on the ice. Practices should be fun and challenging for the players. Coaches should maximize the use of ice time and organize practice so that it builds on game philosophy. The use of scrimmages at practice should be minimized so that more emphasis can be placed on development of individual skills. If a scrimmage is necessary, it should be controlled and add to the players' learning experience.

6) Coaches should help to ensure that players are wearing all the required, approved protective equipment, including neck guards and mouth pieces, while on the ice. (Required equipment is discussed in more detail in the Required Equipment section of this handbook.) Coaches should help to ensure that all equipment worn by a player is proper, safe and fits correctly.

7) NYHL coaches are expected to be familiar with the NYHL Player's Code of Conduct and to enforce this code where applicable.

 C. Communications Between Coaches and Officials

Coaches and officials have more in common than most people think, especially at the younger levels of hockey. They both are teachers of the game and their communication with each other will go a long way in creating a positive atmosphere. Officials should communicate with coaches who are behaving in a non-threatening manner. Oftentimes, a coach may simply need a brief explanation of the rule or a reminder as to the proper interpretation. Officials who honor these requests from coaches are establishing a mutual level of respect that benefits everyone involved.

However, some coaches are assessed penalties because they perform in an abusive or threatening way. Screaming at the official from across the ice, berating an official for a judgment call or standing on the dasher boards are all threatening situations that officials are instructed to penalize. These confrontational situations do not portray a positive image and often will lead to very little constructive communication with the official.

Coaches who remain calm and word their questions or concerns in a non-confrontational manner will more than likely receive an acceptable response from the official. For example, a coach who asks the official, "What did you see when our player was tripped on that last rush?" should receive an honest explanation from the official. In the meantime, the coach who screams, "That was a trip. Why didn't you call it? " will only create a confrontational environment that is not beneficial.

 

 

 

REQUIRED HOCKEY EQUIPMENT

A. Selection of Equipment

Although players are primarily responsible for the care of their hockey equipment, parents should realize that selection of equipment is important. When purchasing or renting equipment, remember two important factors: 1) assure that the player is adequately protected and 2) be sure the equipment fits so that it allows freedom of movement so the player can perform the necessary skills he/she must use in practices and games.

Coaches and parents should help to ensure that players are wearing all the required, approved protective equipment, including neck guards and mouthpieces, while on the ice for games and practices. It is important that all equipment worn by a player is proper, safe and fits correctly. If you feel your child's equipment does not fit properly, it is your responsibility to return it to the place where it was purchased or rented and arrange for suitable equipment to be provided to your son or daughter.

Any player on the ice, on the bench, or in the penalty box must be fully dressed with
all approved, required protective equipment All equipment must be designed
specifically for ice hockey. Equipment used for roller blading, roller hockey or street
hockey is not safe or acceptable for ice hockey. Any player who enters the ice surface without all the proper equipment will be asked to leave the ice, and may return only when the equipment deficiency is corrected. Game officials may impose penalties upon players or teams using improper equipment (e.g., It is a misconduct penalty for any player to play without a mouthpiece; it is also a penalty to play with a stick that is broken.)

All protective equipment except gloves, padded hockey pants, helmet/facemask and goalkeeper's leg pads must be worn under the uniform. When purchasing equipment it is best to acquire equipment that fits now. Purchasing equipment that allows too much room for growth can be unsafe. Required equipment is listed below, along with guidelines for proper fit and care.

B. Required Equipment

·         Helmet - The helmet must be approved by the Hockey Equipment Certification Council (HECC) and must be accompanied by a face mask that provides full facial protection, and any chin protection that accompanies the face mask. All helmet and face mask straps must be properly fastened. If a players's helmet/face mask comes off his/her head during play, the player may not resume play until their helmet/face mask has been replaced. If the goalkeeper's helmet/face mask comes off during play, the referee must stop play immediately.

·         Internal mouthpiece - A colored (non-clear) internal mouthpiece is required to be worn by all players including goalkeepers, in the PeeWee and older age groups. The mouthpiece must cover all teeth of one jaw, customarily the upper.

·         Neck guard - The NYHL requires that an approved neck guard must be worn by all players and goalkeepers at all times. 

·         Shoulder pads - The cap of the shoulder pad should cover the shoulder. Straps under the arms should attach securely. The front flap should come down far enough to cover the collarbone.

·         Elbow pads - Straps should remain tight, providing a snug fit over the elbow. Elbow pads should extend down the forearm to the top of the glove.

·         Shin pads - Shin pads should cover the leg from the top of the skates to above the knees, overlapping a few inches above the bottom of the hip pads or hockey pants. The knee is a primary area of concern for protection. The pad should cover the knee when the leg is straight and when it is bent at the knee. Pads should bend just below the knee in order to conform to the bent leg.

·         Supporter and cup - This is essential protective equipment; check for proper fit.

·         Gloves - Gloves should have ample room for the fingers and thumb and must not be too snug in the wrist area. The cuff of the glove should come up far enough to adequately cover the wrist area, extending up to the bottom of the elbow pads.

·         Hip Pads or Hockey Pants - Pants sizes are usually six sizes larger than the normal waist size. Hockey suspenders are recommended to keep the pants in place. The top padded portion of the pants should cover the hips, lower ribs and kidneys. The bottom of the pants legs should be an inch or two above the knees, overlapping with the top of the shin pads. The area above the knee is often hit by the puck, so make sure there is no gap between the pants and the knee pad. Pants must be held up by suspenders which can be purchased at sporting goods stores.

·         Jersey and socks - Jerseys should be large enough so that movement is not restricted. Socks should be held up by a garter belt which can be purchased at the pro shop or sporting goods stores.

RENTAL OF EQUIPMENT FROM THE NYHL

The NYHL currently maintains an inventory of hockey equipment. This equipment is rented on a first-come, first-serve basis to players who register to play in one of the NYHL's leagues or other sanctioned activities. This inventory includes helmets, shoulder pads, gloves, elbow pads, pants, shin guards and skates. Goalies pads (leg pads, catcher and blacker) are also available to rent. Most of this equipment is for players ages 5 to 12 (Termites to Pee Wees). Older players should plan to purchase their own equipment. In addition to the rental fees charged for using this equipment, a deposit is required to insure that the equipment is returned in good condition. Equipment that is lost or damaged must be paid for by the participant and will result in forfeiture of their deposit or a direct charge to the participant by the NYHL.

Rental equipment is for ice hockey use only. Players are not permitted to use this equipment for roller hockey, in-line skating or similar activities. Players who use rental equipment for unauthorized purposes will be required to return all rental equipment and forfeit all applicable fees.

The NYHL also provides game uniforms to Travel teams and House League All-Star teams. These uniforms must be returned at the end of the season. Lost or damaged uniforms must be paid for by the participant by forfeiture of a deposit or payment of a direct charge levied by the NYHL.

Participants are responsible for maintaining and caring for their equipment while it is in their possession. Equipment which breaks or becomes unsafe to use should not be used under any circumstances.

PROPER CARE OF EQUIPMENT

Proper equipment care is necessary to ensure the safety of the player. All equipment should be aired out and allowed to dry after each game and practice. Placing equipment outside in the sunshine is an extremely effective way to dry and "naturally deodorizing" equipment. "Try it, you'll like it"

·         Helmet - Periodically tighten all screws and wash the interior with soap and a damp cloth.

·         Internal mouthpiece - The mouthpiece should be kept in a separate case and rinsed thoroughly before and after each use.

·         Neck guard - Neck guards should be cleaned and inspected periodically. Most neck guards are machine washable.

·         Shoulder pads - Check the straps for wear. Make sure the shoulder caps are securely attached.

·         Elbow pads - Check the straps for wear and/or elastic fatigue.

·         Supporter and cup - Periodically wash and check for proper fit and signs of wear.

·         Shin pads - Check the knee area for cracks. Make sure padding is not ripped or torn.

·         Gloves - Oil the leather, especially the palms. If the palms are worn, make sure the fingers cannot come out through the palm area.

·         Hip Pads or Hockey Pants - Be sure all the buttons for attaching suspenders are in place. Make sure all pads are in place. Patch any rips in the material.

·         Skates - All players must wear approved hockey skates. (Skates must be equipped with approved safety heel tips if so designed.) Skate blades should be approved by the HECC. The use of speed skates or figure skates is prohibited.

Skates are the hockey player's most important piece of equipment. Young hockey players will be at a tremendous disadvantage without properly fitting skates. Skates should not be bought several sizes too large so that a player may "grow into them." Oversized skates will retard the skating development of every youngster. Typical hockey skate sizes are different than normal shoe sizes, and should be approximately one-half size smaller than a child's normal shoe size. Skates should Jit snugly with only one pair of athletic socks. When the player's toes are pushed all the way to the front of the boot, there should be only enough room at the heel area for a pencil to fit between the heel and the back of the boot. When properly laced, players should not be able to lift their heels, and their toes should be able to move. Rapidly growing youngsters might outgrow more than one pair of skates in a season. Look for "good buys" on skates, but make sure they fit properly.

Skates should be sharpened regularly! A good rule of thumb is to sharpen skates after about every third or fourth use. Another guideline might be to sharpen skates every other week. The important thing is that players learn to skate well on sharpened skates. If the skates become too dull they will inhibit the player's ability to learn to stop, start, accelerate and turn. Blades should be dried after every use and kept dry and protected when not in use.

If skates have removable insoles, the insole should be removed between uses to allow for proper drying of the footbed. Periodically polish the leather, check for loose rivets, and check laces for wear. It is a good idea for players to carry an extra pair of laces in their equipment bag.

·         Sticks - Sticks must be made of wood or other material approved by the USA Hockey Rules Committee (this includes most modern fiberglass and aluminum ice-hockey sticks), and must not have any projections. Adhesive tape of any color may be wrapped around the stick at any place for the purpose of reinforcement or to improve control of the stick or the puck. If a player's stick breaks during play, that stick may no longer be used.

Sticks come in different "lies." Lie refers to the angel between the blade of the stick and the shaft. The smaller the angle, the higher the lie. The most common lie is a five or six for skaters and a twelve or thirteen for goalies. When the player assumes the ready position, the entire bottom portion of the stick blade should be flat on the ice. If just the heel of the stick touches, try a lower lie. If just the toe of the stick touches, try a higher lie.

To determine proper stick length, place the front bottom corner of the stick on the ice between the skates. The top of the shaft should touch the player's face between the chin and lips. If the player is wearing shoes instead of skates, the top of the shaft should touch closer to the player's nose.

The blade of the stick should be taped at all times. The stick should be replaced at the first sign of cracks, splintering or other damage that might cause the stick to break and possibly injure another player. (It is a penalty to play with a chipped, splintered or broken stick.)

Other Equipment

Players should wear a loose hockey jersey and hockey socks as part of their equipment Players should also wear a hockey garter to hold up their hockey socks and suspenders to hold up their pants. These can be purchased through pro shops or from hockey equipment catalogues. Players who do not have all of the necessary equipment or do not have properly fitting equipment should not practice or play games until they have what they need.

USE OF DRESSING ROOMS

Team coaches are expected to supervise use of dressing rooms before and after games and practices. If a coach cannot be present, he should arrange for a suitable replacement Parents can volunteer to serve as Dressing Room Managers. In any case, ADULT SUPERVISION IS MANDATORY WHENEVER A TEAM IS USING A DRESSING ROOM.

The dressing room space is very limited in most rinks. Players and coaches must always treat the dressing rooms with respect since they are the property of the City of Nashville or some other entity. Damage done to any dressing room will result in disciplinary action. Each player and/or team is FINANCIALLY RESPONSIBLE for damages to any dressing area caused by its players.

Players and coaches must also respect other teams' rights to use the dressing room. Each team is responsible for leaving a clean dressing room when they are finished.

All coaches and players should arrive at the rink in time to be dressed and on the ice at their scheduled game or practice time. Remember, teams exiting the ice need to use the dressing rooms. In cases where the team preparing to enter the ice is in the dressing room, the team exiting the ice should not enter the dressing room until it is vacant. Coaches are to use maturity and discretion in coordinating use of the dressing rooms with other teams.

Coaches and teams are encouraged to use their time in the dressing room for positive and constructive talk about the team and the game. A few minutes of constructive locker room "chalk talk" before and after ice-time helps to establish the proper team attitude.

Rink and arena facilities are not responsible for lost, stolen or damaged items. Each player is responsible for his or her equipment and belongings while at the rink. To avoid loss, the locker rooms should be locked while players are on the ice. Coaches should check the dressing room before use for belongings that might be left over from the previous team. They should also check the dressing room after their players are out to see if any personal belongings are left behind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

INSURANCE

You should know that a portion of your child's registration fee to play hockey in the NYHL goes to purchase Excess medical and Catastrophic insurance to cover your son or daughter in the event of a hockey related injury. This insurance is provided through USA Hockey. Since the details of the applicable insurance policy are subject to change, they will not be detailed in this handbook. However, a summary of the insurance program is contained here. The insurance information contained here is not legally binding and is subject to change without notice.

Excess Medical insurance is secondary, meaning that it only covers certain expenses NOT COVERED BY YOUR INSURANCE POLICY. There is a maximum limit to this coverage, usually up to $25,000/medical and $l,000/dental NOT COVERED BY YOUR INSURANCE POLICY. There will also be a deductible, normally between $100 to $250. The excess medical coverage does not cover physical therapy or chiropractic expenses.

Catastrophic Insurance also is secondary to your primary coverage. There is normally a $25,000 deductible. The policy currently covers lifetime medical, dental, and rehabilitation expenses of $1,000,000 per accident.

These two types of insurance cover your son or daughter in North America at USA Hockey sanctioned games, tournaments and practices. In any event, IF YOUR SON OR DAUGHTER IS INJURED, YOU SHOULD REPORT ANY INJURY TO YOUR CHILD'S COACH OR TO A MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. Then, YOU SHOULD COLLECT UNDER YOUR PRIMARY INSURANCE POLICY and then UNDER THE POLICY provided through USA Hockey if certain expenses are not covered under your policy.

PAYMENT OF FEES

Players are expected to pay registration fees in full at the beginning of the season or other sanctioned activity or program. This money is necessary to pay for the ice which the NYHL must purchase for practices, games, skills sessions, etc. The NYHL does not provide "'scholarships" or subsidize players who are unable to pay the applicable fees. Under certain circumstances the NYHL will consider allowing payment on an installment basis or other terms established by the NYHL.

Deposits which may be required for uniforms or rented equipment will be cashed and deposited by the NYHL if the NYHL's uniforms and/or equipment are not returned at the time and place designated by the NYHL.

Participants who have not fully paid all applicable registration fees or have not returned NYHL uniforms or equipment, or who are otherwise indebted to the NYHL may be precluded from registering for any NYHL activities until they have paid all fees and satisfied their entire indebtedness.

VOLUNTEERS

The NYHL needs volunteers! Our youth hockey program depends upon people who volunteer their time and effort to serve you and your children. The people who register your child, rent him equipment, publish the NYHL Newsletter, schedule all of your child's practices and games and coach him/her throughout the season are all volunteers. The people who serve on the Board of Directors and help organize and run league activities are all volunteers. None of these people receive any compensation for their work. Please consider helping our league continue to help children have fun playing hockey.

If you are interested and willing to help out in some capacity, just call any member of the NYHL Board of Directors. Their names and phone numbers are posted on the Sportsplex bulletin board.

REVISION OF THIS HANDBOOK

The NYHL may change or revise its policies, rules and guidelines at any time as deemed necessary by the Board of Directors and without prior notification to participants in the NYHL. These changes or revisions may be included in revised editions of this Handbook when published by the Board of Directors.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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